CYRENAICS photos

Foehn week and the Föhnkrankheit

A Föhn or Foehn is a type of dry, warm, down-slope wind that occurs in the lee (downwind side) of a mountain range.
It is a rain shadow wind that results from the subsequent adiabatic warming of air that has dropped most of its moisture on windward slopes (see orographic lift). As a consequence of the different adiabatic lapse rates of moist and dry air, the air on the leeward slopes becomes warmer than equivalent elevations on the windward slopes. Föhn winds can raise temperatures by as much as 32 °C (58 °F)[1] in just a matter of hours.
Winds of this type are also called “snow-eaters” for their ability to make snow melt or sublimate rapidly. This snow-removing ability is caused not only by warmer temperatures, but also the low relative humidity of the air mass having been stripped of moisture by orographic precipitation coming over the mountain(s).
Föhn winds are notorious among mountaineers in the Alps, especially those climbing the Eiger, for whom the winds add further difficulty in ascending an already difficult peak.
Anecdotally, residents in areas of frequent föhn winds report illnesses ranging from migraines to psychosis. The first clinical review of these effects was published by the Austrian physician, Anton Czermak in the 19th century.[2] A study by the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München found that suicide and accidents increased by 10 percent during föhn winds in Central Europe.[citation needed] The causation of Föhnkrankheit (English: Föhn-sickness) is yet unproven.

la palud

Nikolai Schirmer, Minna RiihimakiMinna RiihimakiEduardo Blanchard Wrigglesworth IVMinna Riihimaki

Minna Riihimaki

Minna Riihimaki

lapalud-23

Minna Riihimaki

nathan wallace-1

luca pandolfiNikolai Schirmerluca pandolfi-1-2luca pandolfi-Roberto Rouge Rossiluca pandolfi-1-7Mika Merikantoross hewitt-1-2nathan wallace-1-2nathan wallace-1-3The chief aka wild bill-bitches please. inspiration.cafe-1-2

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